How Yoga Works

How Yoga Works

How Yoga Works

The secrets of how yoga works to make us truly whole are revealed here in a delightful story based on how these precious teachings reached Tibet form their home in India, over a thousand years ago.

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Comments

  1. Muir, Alexander says:
    47 of 48 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Detailed and deep yoga instruction hidden inside a charming story, August 12, 2006
    By 
    Muir, Alexander (Seattle , WA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: How Yoga Works (Paperback)

    This book is a practical explanation on the deep practices of yoga, encased in an easy to read tale. The protagonist – a young woman – makes a nice change from the bearded, middle-aged male that so often is the ‘star’ of yoga stories. Through the chapters of the book, the storylines cover a) specific directions on how to relate to a yoga practice, b) commentaries on the Yoga Sutras of Master Patanjali, and c) how the practice of yoga actually can transform the world around you, from a prison to a school and beyond.

    Like some other reviewers mention, the story is at first glance a bit simple, this is just the outer layer of a very rich and illuminating book.

    One of the nicest things about it is that it describes yoga without reference to any specific God or religion, in simple and compelling terms that us modern people can probably accept and deal with. All together, its a great work, I highly recommend it.

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  2. Pollyhyper "pollyhyper" says:
    33 of 35 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    If I could give it more than 5 stars, I would!, August 25, 2006
    By 
    Pollyhyper “pollyhyper” (Milford, DE United States) –

    This review is from: How Yoga Works (Paperback)

    I just finished my first reading (there will be many more) of “How Yoga Works” last night and it was bittersweet. To the reviewer who felt corny admitting that it “changed my life,” you are not alone. This is not the first book to delve into the whole of yoga, but it is the first one I have read that does it so accessibly. The authors’ concept of writing this book in the form of a novel makes it more attractive to a greater audience than past attempts. And in a society where the physical poses of yoga have become so popular, I think it is more important than ever to provide insight into the rest of yoga.

    I have felt changes in myself and my thinking since finishing the very first chapter. As I said, now that I have finished reading it in its entirety, I plan to re-read, one chapter at a time, meditating upon the contents of each chapter before beginning another, as I felt like I was really rushing myself through some very important ideas in the first go-round, because I was so excited by the book.

    If you don’t like this book, I will give you your money back myself!

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  3. Kevin Flynn says:
    31 of 34 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Easy access to the Sutras, November 9, 2006
    By 
    Kevin Flynn (Ottawa, Ontario) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: How Yoga Works (Paperback)

    To try to read and understand Patanjali without knowledge of context and purpose, without a living teacher and community which can show this wisdom incarnated, is almost invariably to invite frustration. The authors of this book use the conceit of a story in the course of which the wisdom of the sutras is unfolded. The translation of the sutras in the story is fresh and accessible. The commentary on them — in fact the conversation between characters — expands the reader’s understanding. Certain aspects of the story, particularly its closing chapters, require a rather large suspension of disbelief as the tone becomes increasingly like that of a fairy tale. At times, too, the plot plods forward slowly. Although some may cavil at the fact that not all of the sutras are presented and that those that are are not unfolded in order of their appearance in Patanjali, the overall presentation is certainly faithful to the spirit of the whole. No one is likely to regret having read the book and some will surely benefit from it.

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